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No one should have to choose between earning a paycheck and breathing clean air.

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) strongly supports the passage of Amendment 9 because it would prohibit the use of e-cigarettes in all Florida workplaces where smoking is already prohibited. This includes restaurants and indoor shopping malls.

Updating the state’s Clean Indoor Air Act to include e-cigarettes is essential to protecting workers and the public from the potentially harmful chemicals present in the aerosol generated by these devices. Nobody should have to put his or her life at risk just to earn a paycheck. You can help Floridians protect our right to breathe clean air. On November 6th, vote YES on Amendment 9.

ACS CAN, the nonprofit, nonpartisan advocacy affiliate of the American Cancer Society, supports evidence-based policy and legislative solutions designed to eliminate cancer as a major health problem. ACS CAN works to encourage elected officials and candidates to make cancer a top national priority. ACS CAN gives ordinary people extraordinary power to fight cancer with the training and tools they need to make their voices heard. For more information, visit www.acscan.org.

Resources

Calling all Florida residents and organizations!

We need YOUR support in getting the word out about the benefits of Amendment 9 and the harmful effects of e-cigarette smoke.

Join us in fighting for our right to breathe clean air by downloading and sharing digital resources to help inform Floridians about this important issue. Hover over your favorite image or video, click download and upload into Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter with your favorite caption below. To download all, click HERE.

Captions You Can Share

After you’ve chosen an image or video from above, copy and paste your favorite caption into the post generator in Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram!

  • It’s your right to breathe clean air! Help ensure Florida’s existing Clean Indoor Air Act includes e-cigarettes. Vote YES on Amendment 9 this November. #Yeson9
  • Everyone has the right to breathe clean air at work. Vote YES on Amendment 9 this November to add e-cigarettes to Florida’s Clean Indoor Air Act! #Yeson9
  • No one should have to choose between their health and a paycheck. Vote YES on Amendment 9 this November to add e-cigarettes to Florida’s Clean Indoor Air Act! #Yeson9
  • The aerosol produced by e-cigarettes is not safe, yet they’re still allowed in workplaces. Vote YES on Amendment 9 this November to ensure your right to breathe clean air. #Yeson9
  • 9 in 10 Florida voters agree: Exposure to secondhand smoke is a major health hazard. Update Florida’s Clean Indoor Air Act by including e-cigarettes – Vote YES on Amendment 9 this November! #Yeson9

Handouts You Can Print

Attending an event? Download and print the following Amendment 9 handouts to help spread our message:

Click here to view two palm cards about Amendment 9 and your right to a smoke-free workplace.
Click here to view a handout about e-cigarettes and secondhand smoke.
Click here to view a handout about Florida’s Clean Indoor Air Act.

Download ALL

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What are electronic cigarettes?
A: The term “electronic cigarettes” (or “e-cigarettes”) covers a wide variety of products now on the market, from those that look like cigarettes, pens or flash drives to somewhat larger products like “personal vaporizers.” E-cigarettes most often use a battery-powered coil to turn a liquid solution into an aerosol that is inhaled by the user and those around the user. There are a wide range of reusable e-cigarettes, many of which enable users to replace a nicotine-containing cartridge or refill a tank with other substances, and there are disposable e-cigarettes, which cannot be refilled.

Q: Why should electronic cigarettes be added to the state’s Clean Indoor Air Act?
A: Florida’s current Clean Indoor Air Act protects Floridians right to breathe clean, smoke-free air — free of thousands of chemicals in secondhand smoke and creates an environment that discourages smoking among kids and encourages people who smoke to quit. But, allowing the use of electronic cigarettes in these same workplaces threatens to undermine the success of the existing law by exposing workers and patrons to nicotine and other unknown chemicals. Allowing the use of e-cigarettes in workplaces and public places can also complicate the enforcement of the existing smoke-free law.

Q: Does this issue really belong in the state constitution?
A: Yes. In fact, in 2002 more than 70 percent of Florida voters approved a constitutional amendment prohibiting smoking in most indoor workplaces because they felt protecting public health was an essential right for the people of this state. Amendment 9 simply updates the existing amendment to cover new products that weren’t widely available in the early 2000s.

Q: How harmful is the smoke from e-cigarettes?
A: According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), e-cigarette aerosol is not a harmless. The aerosol may contain nicotine; ultrafine particles that can be inhaled deep into the lungs; flavoring such as diacetyl, a chemical linked to a serious lung disease; volatile organic compounds such as benzene, which is found in car exhaust; and heavy metals such as nickel, tin, and lead. All of these can be inhaled by users and bystanders.

Q: Is the current smoke-free law in Florida working?
A: Absolutely. Prior to 2002, nearly 800,000 private-sector employees and about 1 million restaurant employees were exposed to secondhand smoke EACH DAY. These people can now earn a paycheck without exposing themselves to the proven hazards of tobacco smoke. Voting yes on Amendment 9 would provide even more protection for office workers and restaurant employees who shouldn’t have to risk their lives to earn a paycheck.

Q: Do Floridians really care about this issue?
A: Yes. Florida voters overwhelmingly consider exposure to secondhand smoke to be a health hazard and favor state and local efforts to reduce the number of adults and teens who smoke. Nearly nine in ten (88%) voters say that exposure to secondhand smoke is a health hazard. And, 80 percent of voters favor local and state efforts to reduce the number of adults and teens who smoke cigarettes and e-cigarettes.

Q: Isn’t Amendment 9 about more than just adding e-cigarettes to Florida’s Clean Indoor Air Act?
A: Yes. Amendment 9 includes two issues that are bundled together. ACS CAN is encouraging a “yes” vote on the amendment because including e-cigarettes in the state’s Clean Indoor Air Act would protect workers and the general public from the potentially hazardous chemicals that are present in the aerosol generated by these products. Nobody should have to risk their life when they walk into a restaurant, shopping mall or any other indoor workplace.

News

Florida Voters Overwhelmingly Pass Amendment 9

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Nov. 7, 2018 – Nearly 70 percent of Florida voters supported Amendment 9 at the polls today, which will add a prohibition on using electronic smoking devices in most indoor workplaces to the state’s Constitution. In response to these election results, Heather Youmans, Florida’s senior government relations director with the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) released the following statement.

“Tonight’s election results represent a tremendous victory for public health in Florida. This is a mandate from the people of Florida that everyone has the right to breathe clean air. Adding a prohibition on using e-cigarettes in indoor workplaces to the state’s constitution promises to protect workers and the public from the potentially harmful chemicals present in the aerosol generated by these devices.

“In the upcoming legislative session, we pledge to work closely with elected officials on both sides of the aisle to implement the will of the people by updating Florida’s Clean Indoor Air Act.  When this is done, nobody will have to put his or her life on the line just to earn a paycheck.”

The American Cancer Society estimates that 135,170 Floridians will be diagnosed with cancer this year and 45,030 will die from the disease.  Additionally, nearly 30 percent of cancer deaths in the state are a direct result of smoking.